How to paint a Mural

If you plan to paint a mural using acrylics, this blog post will answer a few of your questions.

  • What type of paint should I use to paint a mural?
  • What other materials do I need to paint a mural?
  • How do I prepare a wall before painting a mural on it?

When you paint a mural, you’ll have two distinct stages of painting, just as when you paint on canvas: first you’ll create an under painting to block in main areas of colour and outline the general composition, and then you’ll paint in the details.

To paint large blocks of colour use interior household paint. Painting large blocks of colour with latex paint is more economical than trying to cover the entire wall with artist quality acrylics. You will get better coverage from interior household paint and save yourself a ton of money.

Interior household paint comes in different sheens: flat, low sheen, satin and semi-gloss. An eggshell sheen works best for murals. Avoid satin or semi-gloss sheens, because they are too shiny. The flat sheen is also not ideal as it cannot be scrubbed. Low Sheen is just right because it can be cleaned and accepts layers of paint on top of it.

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For the detailed sections on your mural, use tubes and jars of artist-quality acrylics and proceed just as if you were painting on canvas.

Other materials you’ll need to paint a mural

Paintbrushes: You’ll need a variety of paintbrushes, from small to wide. The sizes you’ll need will largely depend on the amount of detail you’ll be painting. For covering large areas with paint, use wide brushes – 1″, 2″ and 3″ wide brushes. You can use a 4″ brush, if you have a lot of space you want to fill in quickly with a single colour. For smaller detailed areas, use an array of round brushes in different sizes.

Primer/Sealer: Just as you would prime a canvas before painting on it, you should prime a wall before painting a mural. The primer will create a smooth, even surface that will readily accept acrylic paint.

Paint Tray and Roller: If you are going to cover wide areas with a single colour, consider pouring your paint into a paint tray and using a roller to apply the paint to the wall. This will save you a lot of time.

Painter’s Tape: You’ll need tape for adhering a protective covering on the floor. The best tape to use is a painters’ tape, because it is easy to remove.

Palette: Once you’re ready to paint in the details, you’ll need a palette upon which to mix your paints.

Newspaper or Plastic /Canvas Drop Cloth: Spread newspaper or a plastic tarpaulin on the floor where you will be painting, and use the painters’ tape to secure it to the base boards.

Apron or old clothes: As you learn how to paint a mural, you’ll discover that painting walls is messy. Be sure to dress appropriately or wear the proper protection.

Cup for water: You’ll need a sturdy cup to hold the water that you’ll dip your brushes into for rinsing and cleaning.

A bottle of clean water: In addition to water for your brushes, a separate bottle of clean water is handy to keep on standby if you accidentally spill paint.

Paper towels and/or old rags: Paper towels and old rags are essential for cleaning up spills.

Stool or stepladder: For reaching the high parts of the wall.

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We’d love to see your pics once done. Do share!

Happy Painting!

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Fixing common painting problems

Drips, brush marks, and stains are a huge disappointment to find after putting in time, effort, and sweat into painting your walls yourself.

So how can you easily fix such common mistakes without too much additional effort? Read on to learn how to fix some of the most common painting mistakes.

Remove drips from paint

To avoid drips in the first place, make sure you don’t overload your paintbrush as you paint. But if you end up with drips, follow these steps.

  1. With a scraper, carefully scrape the paint drips.
  2. Sand the area until it’s smooth, so you cannot feel the edges.
  3. Remove sanding dust with a clean rag.
  4. Repaint the area.

 

Get rid of brush marks

Brush marks often show up on natural wood finishes. They can also be caused by overloading your paintbrush. Get rid of them with these steps:

  1. Sand the area with a small piece of sandpaper. For larger areas use a hand sander/machine sander.
  2. Remove sanding dust with a clean rag.
  3. Repaint the area.

Interior Remodeling and Painting

Remove stains

If you don’t properly prime before painting, it’s possible for stains to show through your new paint coats. Here’s the best way for stains to be gone:

  1. Using a heavy duty cleaner (not caustic based), clean the area thoroughly.
  2. Let dry completely.
  3. Apply an oil-based undercoat over the stain.
  4. Once the undercoat is dry, repaint.

 

Fix flaking paint

Flaking paint happens over time as moisture finds its way under your painted surface. But it can also happen when you apply paint to a damp surface. Fix flaking paint by following these steps:

  1. Use a paint scraper or wire brush to remove the flaking paint.
  2. Sand the area. Start with a coarse abrasive, and finish the sanding with a fine abrasive.
  3. Work hard to smooth the edges between the painted and scraped areas. Otherwise, the new coat of paint will highlight those lines.
  4. Remove dust with a clean rag.
  5. Prime the area.
  6. Repaint.

 

Get rid of mildew

You’ll find mildew in bathrooms and kitchens because moisture tends to be a constant occurrence in these rooms. Take care of the problem with these steps:

  1. Wearing protective eye-wear, gloves, and clothing, wash the area with a heavy duty cleaner, water, bleach, and a clean stiff brush.
  2. Go bottom to top so you don’t stain the surface.
  3. Let the wall dry for at least two days.
  4. Remove dust with a clean rag.
  5. Prime with a primer that contains mildew protection.
  6. Repaint with two coats of paint.

Happy Painting!

Tips for painting tricky areas

Painting is a DIY project that anyone can master in a short amount of time if they have the patience for it. Walls are easy to get a hang of but it’s often the uneven and hard to reach places that prove a challenge. Even a seasoned painter, will encounter tricky or difficult-to-reach areas occasionally.

Fortunately, we have some easy tricks to paint these areas with excellent results. Here are pro tips that address three common problem areas.

Painting window trims

Sometimes it’s a real challenge to paint windows neatly, especially when there is wood diving the panes of glass. It is also time-consuming as you need to mask tape the glass before starting. What if you didn’t need to use your painter’s tape? It doesn’t matter if your paint job is a bit messy. It’s ok to get paint on the window glass. Just wait for the paint to dry, and then scrape it off easily with a razor blade, for clean, crisp edges. For best results, scrape up the dried paint soon after it dries, and don’t let it sit for more than a day.

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Painting behind the toilet

Bathrooms have more tight areas than most rooms, and perhaps the most challenging of all is the space behind the toilet. What you’ll need is a smaller, narrower and shorter roller. This is the best tool for painting behind the toilet, and also for painting behind radiators and other wall fixtures.

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In fact, you may find all kinds of tight spaces that your hot dog roller can reach that might have been a real challenge to paint without it. If you need a longer handle on the roller to get into a particularly tight or high space, you can screw on an extension pole to provide the right amount of reach.

Painting high ceilings and walls

There may be some high areas in your home where a ladder simply can’t go, such as above a staircase. And when you need to paint a wall right up to the ceiling, you might face a challenge.

Perhaps in the past you’ve tried attaching a paintbrush to a pole to reach these high areas. But that can be very awkward, and it could turn messy.

What you will need is a paintbrush extension tool. It works like an extension of your arm, holding your paintbrush right up to the top of the wall in the area where a roller can’t go. And it’s flexible, so you can position your paintbrush in just the right way.

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Load your paintbrush judiciously; using less paint than you would if you were painting a wall in front of you. Take your time to get neat, drip-free results.

Painting high spaces, window trims, and areas behind fixtures are just a few of the areas that might present a challenge when you’re giving your room a paint makeover. Write to us if you are facing challenges with painting other tricky surfaces around the house and we will be glad to offer a solution.

Also, read our blog on how to paint tiled roofs, another challenging area for many – https://deluxecoatingsau.wordpress.com/2017/06/09/how-to-paint-a-tiled-roof/

Happy Painting.

(Pics from pixabay.com)

Caring for your paint brushes and rollers

Brushes

A paint brush cover is important to any paint brush. It helps the brush maintain its shape when it dries and protects it when you need to transport it.

A simple and free method to keeping your brushes protected is to use old toilet paper rolls. Just flatten out the roll and you have a perfect fit for a 2 inch brush which is possibly the most versatile brush.

Clean paint brushes immediately after use. Do not soak brushes in solvent or water, as this can damage the bristles.

To wash latex paint off a paint brush any mild bar soap or dishwashing detergent will work. Prepare soapy water and pour into a clean container. Dip the paint brush into the mixture, working the soap through the brush bristles. Follow with a clear water rinse. Repeat the process if necessary. Always use a clean container with clean soapy water and follow with a clear water rinse. For stubborn water-based paints, try lacquer thinner, followed by warm soapy water and a clear water rinse.

When cleaning oil-based paints, varnishes, lacquers and shellacs from your paint brush, closely follow the manufacturer’s instructions to select the proper cleaning solvent. Pour the solvent into a container and dip the paint brush into the solvent. Work thinner through the brush bristles, dipping up and down in container several times. Spin the paint brush into a waste area to remove excess thinner and then repeat process with a clean container and clean thinner.

A paint brush comb is also a good tool to clean a paint brush. This tool is very useful in cleaning through the center of the brush and removing any residue near the ferrule’s edge. Paint residue left in the brush will harden and “set” the bristles, making them lose their bend recovery. Once clean, use the paint brush comb to straighten the bristles. Reshape the paint brush to its original shape and lay flat to dry.  Do not use a wire brush on a paint brush. While it will help remove the dried paint from the tips of the bristle, it also knocks off the flag (splits) at the end of the bristles.

Whenever possible, store brushes by hanging them. Never store a paint brush on its tip, which can result in “curling.”

Consider using different brushes for oil-based products and water-based products. It is much easier to clean the paint brushes if you don’t switch back and forth between the two types of bases.

 

Rollers

Remove roller cover sleeve from the painting frame immediately after using. Do not allow the paint to begin drying on the paint roller. Clean roller covers immediately after use. Never leave the roller sleeve soaking in water or solvent.

To clean oil-based paints, varnishes, lacquers and shellacs from your roller cover, closely follow manufacturer’s instructions in selecting the proper cleaning solvent. Pour the solvent into a container and dip the roller cover into the solvent. Repeat this process using a clean container and fresh solvent until the roller cover is clean.

Cleaning water-based paints from your paint roller covers requires a good wash with soap and warm water. Then rinse until clean. Repeat the process if necessary. Always use a clean container with clean soapy water and follow with a clear water rinse. If needed, use a putty knife to help scrape off the paint. For stubborn water-based paints, try mineral spirits or lacquer thinner, followed by warm soapy water and a clear water rinse.

Dry and store your roller covers with care. String roller covers on rope or dowels to aid in drying the sleeves. Don’t stand the paint roller on its end or lay it down. Dry thoroughly before storing in dust-free cabinets or boxes.

The right way to use chalk paint

Chalk Paint is specifically designed for furniture and it can be used on walls, doors and shutters and more.

It has a chalky finish and is often used to achieve a shabby chic or aged look because it is easily distressed.

Chalk painting on furniture doesn’t have any set guidelines. If you are doing this for the first time, start small. Maybe, with a stool or a nightstand. Don’t choose something with a lot of detail or challenging aspects. Stick with one colour to begin.

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Here’s what you need to begin:

  1. Chalk paint
  2. Finishing wax (optional)
  3. Paint brushes, one for painting and one for applying wax
  4. Drop cloth
  5. Moist cloth for dusting/accidental drips
  6. Sand paper, for smoothing

The pros

You can paint indoors because there are no harsh odours.

Most pieces don’t need prep.  Just dust off and begin to paint.

It dries super fast.  You can paint 2-3 coats in a day.

The prep

Use a moist cloth and remove all dust and dirt. Dry it well. Make sure there is no oil from treatment products like furniture oil.

If your piece has loose paint you should do a little sanding. If you will be distressing your piece then these other layers of paint will add fun character to your piece.

The process

Shake your chalk paint well.  Because of the thicker consistency you will need to stir every 15 minutes or so.

Use back and forth quick strokes. Paint in all directions.  Work in a small space and move quickly as it dries very fast. Don’t go over an area you just painted.  Don’t worry if you see paint strokes or if you can see through on your first coat.  The second coat will cover up.

Let your first coat dry for 2 hours before moving to the next.  Follow the same for your second coat if you need a third. Usually, two coats should do.

After you are done painting, take a small piece of sandpaper and pass over your piece lightly, as if you were dusting. This is for smoothing only and makes a big difference in the look of your final product.

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Waxing is not essential, but without it your piece will look slightly more rustic with an unfinished look. Waxing will ensure protection from wear and tear and give it a slightly more finished look.

Apply wax with a regular brush. Then wipe it with a lint-free cloth. Let your piece dry overnight before use.

Happy Painting!

DIY: How to restore your deck

An ageing deck will have all the tell tale signs. It will appear patchy, weathered, mouldy or mildewed. That’s when you know it is time for restoration.

If you have a few days of fair weather – no rain and not too hot – it is the right time to embark on your DIY restoration project. If there’s a chance of rain or high temperatures, wait for a break in the weather.

You need at least 24 hours without rain to get the best results. So, check the forecast and also keep in mind that direct, strong sunlight can be as damaging as rain.

Start with the prep work. The first thing to do when staining your deck is to clean it thoroughly. Before applying deck stain, all surface tannins, water stains, extractives and dirt must be removed. This allows the timber grain to open, so the stain can penetrate and adhere to the decking.

Use any wood cleaner with a stiff brush. Allow to stand for ten minutes before using a pressure cleaner to rinse the product off your deck.

Once your deck is clean and dry, it is time to sand it (if required) and then apply deck stain in a colour of your choice.

In terms of the amount of product required, each timber variety has different characteristics, and coating specifications change for each. A basic formula to determine how much you need is to calculate your deck’s area before purchasing.

When applying the stain, be sure to apply as per product specifications so you get the colour and sheen as expected. Apply it generously along the length of the boards, working two to three boards at a time, using a good quality brush and applicator. If you’re trying a new colour it might be a bright idea to test the product on a concealed area to see how the end result will look.

Remember, periodically cleaning your deck with a mild detergent can rejuvenate the deck’s surface and extend its life by removing dirt and stains.

 

Common Painting Mistakes

Painting your own home is a fairly simple DIY task. However, many first timers make mistakes that leave them feeling frustrated when the job done doesn’t end up looking professional and money spent is wasted.

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Here are a few common mistakes and how to avoid them.

Use of inferior applicators

After buying good quality paint, you might be inclined to buy cheap brushes and rollers in an effort to cut costs. You will always need good quality painting tools and accessories. It is money well spent.

Improper preparation of walls

When it comes to painting, start with a blank slate. Firstly dust your walls down, and make sure all repair work is done prior to applying paint. For paint to be applied smoothly, your walls should be smooth and clean, dry and free of any loose debris.

Skipping small details

Attention to detail is what is required to create a great finish. For clean lines and professional-looking results, use masking tape. Taping ensures that you’ll have the crisp edges you want. To prevent bleeding, make sure the tape is sealed tightly around baseboards, windows, light fittings and mouldings. Once you have finished painting, gently removed the making tape while the paint is wet, if you wait until the paint is dry you will pull the paint off with the masking tape.

Leaving surroundings unprotected

Even before opening a can of paint, make sure your work zone is protected. If possible, remove all the furniture from the room. Cover the entire floor with a drop cloth. You’ll thank yourself for this 10-minute prep when you’re not scrubbing paint splatter off floors later.

Working without primer

Never skip the paint primer. Primer/Sealer prepares the wall surface so that patching and sanding can be done. Primer/Sealer also allows the next coat of paint to be applied easily, plus it ensures the true colour of the paint shines through.

 

Happy Painting!

How to select the right wall for an accent wall

If you have wondered how to pick a wall to feature as an accent wall, then you are not alone.

Accent walls can be tricky to select, but if done right, they can add interest and excitement to a space with little money spent.

While skimming through a home décor magazine, drooling over a dining room or hallway with a stunning accent wall, you are only seeing part of the picture.  You may love what you see but you have to remember how it will apply to your home, and you need to think of the space as a whole.

It isn’t as simple as adding a few ‘pops of colour’ to get your intended look.  In order to achieve a certain look, all of the colours and the décor in a space must be considered.

So how does one select the right wall to accent?

Accent walls should only be done for two reasons:

  1. A wall is symmetrical.
  2. A wall has an architectural detail you want to highlight, like an art niche, a fireplace detail, or special mouldings.

When you paint an accent wall, you are trying to create added style and flair.

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And how does one pick the right colour for an accent wall?

Look for colours that are already present in the space.  For example – cushions, pictures, knick knacks, rugs, drapes, etc.

You could also choose a colour that is in use in another part of the home for the accent colour.

For example, the living room and dining room might be one colour while the family room is another.

Try using the living room/dining room colour as the accent in the family room. This works well to bring unity and cohesion in the space, without letting it getting too busy.

Using an accent colour that is two or three shades off the main colour is commonly done but not advised.

Happy Painting!

Steps for removing wallpaper

To get this job started, organise a plastic drop cloth or canvas, a spray bottle and a wallpaper scraper – putty knife or razor blade. A razor scraper is best used on plaster walls, the putty knife on drywall or gypsum board. You can use the razor edge wallpaper removal tool on drywall, but the wallpaper must be thoroughly saturated with hot water containing vinegar so it can be razored off without damages.

To start, turn off the electricity in the room where you will be removing wallpaper. Move furniture away from the walls. Place the drop sheet at the base of the wall.

Before you fill the spray bottle make lines on the surface of wallpaper without going too deep.

Fill the spray bottle with regular white vinegar and hot water. It works better than chemicals, and vinegar is cheap. Use a 2:1 solution, two parts hot water and one part vinegar.

Once you spray the wallpaper, you will notice that it will soak up all the water and look dry. As long as too much water is not dripping, you can spray more water. Then after 20 minutes, spray once more liberally. It is fine if water drips on to the drop sheet. Start scrapping off the sheets but be careful of the slippery mess the paper and glue can make.

After you have completely stripped off the wallpaper, get the glue off. Try to remove the glue as soon as possible after removing the wallpaper while the glue is very wet. You can use a wet rag followed with a clean, dry rag. You can also use your razor scraper or spackle knife to scrape off the glue.

Let the wall dry thoroughly before painting.