How lighting affects paint colour

Have you ever painted a room only to discover that the finished result doesn’t quite look like the swatch you picked out?

The type of light makes a huge difference in how colour looks in a room. Because of this, it’s important to consider the type of lighting that exists in a room you’re painting.

For example: A dark hallway without enough natural light will need a colour that looks good in artificial lighting, while a sun soaked room with lots of windows needs a shade that reflects natural lighting.

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The best way to see how the light works in your space is to do a few test spots on the walls. Choose different walls so you can see how the colour looks at various times during the day. You can then adjust the colour a few shades darker or lighter to get the exact look you’re after.

The location of the room also makes a big difference in how much light you get each day. You might get a lot of morning light in a room, but if you spend most of your time there in the evening, you’ll want a colour that makes the space seem brighter without relying on natural light.

North facing rooms can be tough to work with since they tend to be on the darker side. Light from the North is cooler and tends to make colours look dull. It’s best to stick to colours with warmer undertones. If you’re going with white make sure you go with a creamy, warm white.

South facing rooms are probably the easiest spaces to work with. They are filled with light for most of the day, so most colours look great. To take advantage of the light, opt for lighter tones that really amplify it. Dark colours also work well, but they can often seem brighter than usual, so you may need to adjust the shade accordingly.

Rooms that face West get a few different types of light throughout the day. They don’t get much morning light, so they tend to be dull in the morning. As the light shifts, the room will warm up and make bright colours seem brighter. You’ll want to consider when you spend the most time in West facing rooms and choose your colour accordingly to balance the morning /afternoon/evening light.

East facing rooms have the opposite experience of West facing rooms. They get the gorgeous glow of morning light and become progressively darker. So think about whether you want to highlight the warm morning light or if you need to warm it up in the afternoon and evening. Cool colours will look their best in the morning and those with warmer undertones can be chosen for later in the day.

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Artificial light comes into play during those hours when your rooms aren’t getting much natural light. Not all artificial light is the same, so the kind of bulbs you use is also something to consider.

Fluorescent bulbs give off a blue tinted light. This works well with cooler colours like blue and green. You can find fluorescents that are designed to give off warmer lights, but they aren’t quite as warm as incandescent lights.

Incandescent bulbs give off a warmer light with yellow or amber undertones and can enhance warmer colours like red, orange, or yellow and make them seem brighter. They do the opposite with cool colours like blue and green, making them appear more dull and muted.

Halogen lights are the closest to natural light. They give off a white light and don’t change the appearance of colours as much as other types of light. Halogen lights works well with both warm and cool colours.

Happy Painting!

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2019’s trending colours

2018 was all about bringing an edgier palette into the home–with vibrant reds, modern metallics, and variations of the black accent wall.

2019 is taking a more mindful, lifestyle-based approach. Most paint brands have released their colours of the year and they range from aquas to terracottas.

If you’re looking to kick-start your new year by refreshing your walls, check out 2019’s top colour trends.

HAZELNUT

Warm and inviting creamy shades of hazelnut will never go out of style nor clash with existing furnishings as it makes for one comforting, neutral go-to hue.

DARK GREEN

From muted to moody, the deep green colour trend can work to emulate the feeling of lush botanicals and the healing power of nature in your home while setting the tone with a strong foundational hue.

For hunter to bottle green, this trend should be reserved for well-lit, large rooms as its intensity can overpower small spaces and make them look darker.

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MUSTARD

For those looking for a pop of colour and an alternative to gold or yellow, deep mustard is great for instantly creating rich focal accents.

Muted and moody mustard home interior colours create provocative depth and highlight décor and art brilliantly.

BLUES

If you are a traditionalist with a casual approach to interior design, try a new shade of blue – charcoal blue, ice blue, gray-blue, and a very pale powder blue are great options when looking for paint colours that are unique yet subtle enough to not take over a room.

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PEWTER

The perfect gray-beige, it is a rich alternative to all white walls. Pewter is the new black and anything but bland.

PALE PINK

Pale pinks will prevail in 2019 due to their neutral properties and compatibility with other shades. They can be mixed with an abundance of white or a lemon yellow for the ideal look.

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Have a colourful new year. Happy Painting.

 

 

Pics courtesy: freepik.com

Planning your nursery

This blog article is for all the parents to be, who are busy preparing for their new, little bundle of joy to arrive.

This article will help you decide on the perfect look to give your nursery you’ve always dreamed of for your little one.

Here are some of the ways you can prepare your nursery other than just wall paint colour.

CHOOSE A THEME

Not only will a nursery theme help you select the wall colours, but it will also help you plan your decor, as well as give those who attend your baby shower some suggestions on what they can gift you to match the theme.

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ADD ART

If you want pastel coloured walls, we think that’s a great idea. However, if you want bright colours in your nursery, you can either get colourful posters and frame them or add one bright accent wall. The artwork you use doesn’t necessarily need to be themed for babies.

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GREY IS GREAT

We don’t mean that you need to paint the walls grey, (although, that is certainly an option) but we do know that finding white furniture or décor accents like linen, toys, shelves etc to match or contrast the grey can be helpful. Choosing grey or any other neutral colour can keep the room looking light and classy.

GENDER DOESN’T LIMIT COLOUR

Whatever colour you want in your baby’s nursery is up to you. There is no pressure to adhere to any colour rules with regard to gender or any other nursery tradition. A baby boy doesn’t mean you need to choose blue. A blue nursery for a girl is just as lovely.

Happy Painting!

How to rock blue interiors

Blue interiors are a favourite choice with home makers, offices, cafes and restaurants across the globe.  Maybe that’s why we do many photos of blue interiors in home magazines.

Blue is a cool colour by nature, and it works well with pretty much any other cool tone: gray, purple, even black. It’s not as easy to work with as brown or beige, but blue can be really striking when set off by metallics, crisp whites, or even deep reds.

Here are 5 colour combination ideas for truly rocking blue interiors.

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Murky blues are understated but classy and can be teamed with neutral furniture and bright home accents.

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Punctuate a teal blue wall with a deep red chair to add some drama and boldness.

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Classic pastel blues and whites for kids’ rooms work for both genders.

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Light blue walls complement natural wood furniture too and don’t only need to be paired with white only.

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Deep, inky blues can form a dramatic back drop if used as a feature wall choice.

Share pics from your home if you have rocking blue interiors too. We’d love to drool.

Happy Painting!

 

 

The colour of your child’s room affects their mood

When it’s time to paint your child’s room, you’ll probably agree to choose your child’s favourite colour. While pleasing your child is important (they’ll be the one spending time in the room, after all), don’t overlook the importance of colour psychology.  It is true that the colour of your child’s room affects their mood.

Red

Red is energizing and exciting. It can increase heart rate and blood pressure, and stimulate appetite. On the flip side, it can also produce greater feelings of anger and hostility. Be careful about adding an element to your child’s bedroom that will increase energy (and may increase anger). Typically, red is great for an accent wall. Much more than that could make things a bit too intense.

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Pink

Pink calms emotions, and can even help to increase empathy and nurturing feelings. But, when exposed to a lot of pink, children tend to tire of the colour. Small accents are typically the best choice.

Orange

Orange is cheerful and friendly. Children tend to play more cooperatively in orange rooms, and the colour inspires confidence as well. But like red or pink, too much can be overwhelming. Orange is also great for accent colours in a child’s bedroom.

Yellow

Yellow has been shown to boost memory and concentration, which is especially great if your child does homework in his bedroom. Yellow is also associated with happiness and cheerfulness. However, be aware that it can make settling down difficult for a child who struggles with sleep.

Green

Green makes us think of nature, and has a calming and soothing effect on children (and adults!). This can be especially helpful for children who struggle with anxiety. While red and orange should be used sparingly, green is safe to use all around the room.

Blue

Blue is great for children who have behavioural problems because it has a very soothing effect. It reduces anxiety and anger. Balancing it with the confidence of orange or the cheeriness of yellow produces a well-rounded vibe in a room.

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Happy Painting!

Signs that indicate your house needs painting

Taking care of your home interiors with regular spends on maintenance is one of the most important things you can do to keep its value up. Along with keeping your kitchen and bathrooms clean, a fresh paint job on the outside every few years makes the house look inviting. Quality paint must be the only option to consider for protecting your home’s exterior against the elements.

So how do you know when it’s time to paint your house? Watch for these signs.

  1. Paint shows signs of wear

Peeling, bubbling, and cracking paint are signs that the paint wasn’t applied correctly in the first place or that the paint has succumbed to the elements. It could also indicate dry rot or mould. Do not ignore these signs. Immediate maintenance is advised.

  1. Paint is fading

Fading paint makes a house look worn and tired and definitely brings down market value as first impressions are everything. Dark paints fade quicker than lighter paints, so when repainting, choose a colour wisely. You can speak to our experts for a paint consultation in this matter.

  1. Visible gaps or shrinking

If you have a wooden exterior and it appears that the boards on your home’s exterior are shrinking and gaps are visible between the boards it is a sign of potential dry rot. This means that moisture could be getting into the wood. Talk to a professional to assess the damage.

  1. Caulk is cracking

If the caulking on the exterior of your house is cracking or showing signs of being brittle, it has lost its elasticity and it’s time for an updated paint job.

So how often does your house need to be painted?

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Exteriors should be painted every 5 to 10 years. This time frame depends also on how well your house was painted the last time, the quality of paint that was used, the quality of the prep work that was done, the location of your house and the surface of your exterior walls.

Wood surfaces need to be painted every 3 to 7 years. Stucco should be repainted every 5 to 6 years.

Happy Painting!

Caring for your paint brushes and rollers

Brushes

A paint brush cover is important to any paint brush. It helps the brush maintain its shape when it dries and protects it when you need to transport it.

A simple and free method to keeping your brushes protected is to use old toilet paper rolls. Just flatten out the roll and you have a perfect fit for a 2 inch brush which is possibly the most versatile brush.

Clean paint brushes immediately after use. Do not soak brushes in solvent or water, as this can damage the bristles.

To wash latex paint off a paint brush any mild bar soap or dishwashing detergent will work. Prepare soapy water and pour into a clean container. Dip the paint brush into the mixture, working the soap through the brush bristles. Follow with a clear water rinse. Repeat the process if necessary. Always use a clean container with clean soapy water and follow with a clear water rinse. For stubborn water-based paints, try lacquer thinner, followed by warm soapy water and a clear water rinse.

When cleaning oil-based paints, varnishes, lacquers and shellacs from your paint brush, closely follow the manufacturer’s instructions to select the proper cleaning solvent. Pour the solvent into a container and dip the paint brush into the solvent. Work thinner through the brush bristles, dipping up and down in container several times. Spin the paint brush into a waste area to remove excess thinner and then repeat process with a clean container and clean thinner.

A paint brush comb is also a good tool to clean a paint brush. This tool is very useful in cleaning through the center of the brush and removing any residue near the ferrule’s edge. Paint residue left in the brush will harden and “set” the bristles, making them lose their bend recovery. Once clean, use the paint brush comb to straighten the bristles. Reshape the paint brush to its original shape and lay flat to dry.  Do not use a wire brush on a paint brush. While it will help remove the dried paint from the tips of the bristle, it also knocks off the flag (splits) at the end of the bristles.

Whenever possible, store brushes by hanging them. Never store a paint brush on its tip, which can result in “curling.”

Consider using different brushes for oil-based products and water-based products. It is much easier to clean the paint brushes if you don’t switch back and forth between the two types of bases.

 

Rollers

Remove roller cover sleeve from the painting frame immediately after using. Do not allow the paint to begin drying on the paint roller. Clean roller covers immediately after use. Never leave the roller sleeve soaking in water or solvent.

To clean oil-based paints, varnishes, lacquers and shellacs from your roller cover, closely follow manufacturer’s instructions in selecting the proper cleaning solvent. Pour the solvent into a container and dip the roller cover into the solvent. Repeat this process using a clean container and fresh solvent until the roller cover is clean.

Cleaning water-based paints from your paint roller covers requires a good wash with soap and warm water. Then rinse until clean. Repeat the process if necessary. Always use a clean container with clean soapy water and follow with a clear water rinse. If needed, use a putty knife to help scrape off the paint. For stubborn water-based paints, try mineral spirits or lacquer thinner, followed by warm soapy water and a clear water rinse.

Dry and store your roller covers with care. String roller covers on rope or dowels to aid in drying the sleeves. Don’t stand the paint roller on its end or lay it down. Dry thoroughly before storing in dust-free cabinets or boxes.

The right way to use chalk paint

Chalk Paint is specifically designed for furniture and it can be used on walls, doors and shutters and more.

It has a chalky finish and is often used to achieve a shabby chic or aged look because it is easily distressed.

Chalk painting on furniture doesn’t have any set guidelines. If you are doing this for the first time, start small. Maybe, with a stool or a nightstand. Don’t choose something with a lot of detail or challenging aspects. Stick with one colour to begin.

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Here’s what you need to begin:

  1. Chalk paint
  2. Finishing wax (optional)
  3. Paint brushes, one for painting and one for applying wax
  4. Drop cloth
  5. Moist cloth for dusting/accidental drips
  6. Sand paper, for smoothing

The pros

You can paint indoors because there are no harsh odours.

Most pieces don’t need prep.  Just dust off and begin to paint.

It dries super fast.  You can paint 2-3 coats in a day.

The prep

Use a moist cloth and remove all dust and dirt. Dry it well. Make sure there is no oil from treatment products like furniture oil.

If your piece has loose paint you should do a little sanding. If you will be distressing your piece then these other layers of paint will add fun character to your piece.

The process

Shake your chalk paint well.  Because of the thicker consistency you will need to stir every 15 minutes or so.

Use back and forth quick strokes. Paint in all directions.  Work in a small space and move quickly as it dries very fast. Don’t go over an area you just painted.  Don’t worry if you see paint strokes or if you can see through on your first coat.  The second coat will cover up.

Let your first coat dry for 2 hours before moving to the next.  Follow the same for your second coat if you need a third. Usually, two coats should do.

After you are done painting, take a small piece of sandpaper and pass over your piece lightly, as if you were dusting. This is for smoothing only and makes a big difference in the look of your final product.

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Waxing is not essential, but without it your piece will look slightly more rustic with an unfinished look. Waxing will ensure protection from wear and tear and give it a slightly more finished look.

Apply wax with a regular brush. Then wipe it with a lint-free cloth. Let your piece dry overnight before use.

Happy Painting!

Colour choice for a most productive office

Colour can majorly affect how productive you are.

What defines whether a colour is stimulating or soothing is not the colour, it’s the intensity. A strong bright colour will stimulate, and a pastel colour will soothe.

Interestingly, when you combine more than one colour, you get the effects of both of them. For example, if you combine a bright/bold yellow with a bright/bold blue, you will get a colour that stimulates both your emotions (yellow) and mind (blue).

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If you need to stimulate your mind, then blue would likely make you the most productive.  If you do mind-work all day, try blue with a bit of orange.

If you’re a designer, and you want creativity, make yellow your choice, because it stimulates your ego and spirits, and makes you more optimistic.

If you want to be more productive doing something physical, the colour red would make you more productive because it stimulating.

If you’re in an environment where having a strong sense of balance is the most important, the colour green might just be the colour that makes you the most productive.

To determine which colour to paint your office, first decide which main colour (or combination of colours) will work the best in your profession by deciding whether you want to affect your mind, emotions, body, or balance.

At the same time, the colour chosen is both scientific and personal to you.

Happy Painting!